Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3 - Uprising - Game Review

Friday, Aug 11, 2017 | Post by Wiktorija | 0 comment(s)

The first addition to Red Alert 3 was a record-breaking record. Was the haste in the production of the Uprising reflected on its quality? The answer to this question is in our review.

Command & Coquare Red Alert 3 Uprising

I do not know what happened to the Los Angeles Electronic Arts staff, but lately, they've been pushing themselves up. The third instalment of the Red Alert series debuted on the market last October, and it took just over four months to reach its first expansion. Considering the fact that we are dealing with a full-fledged addition, the feat is admirable, especially since with Kane's insufficiently developed Wrath, EAL's have been murdered far longer. Recall that the first add-on to the Tiberium Wars hit stores a year after the launch of the cradle.

So much for bad news, now it's definitely better. The uprising is a standalone extension, and that means that it does not need a basic version of the game. So if the third Red Alert disc scratches your brother and the dog has eaten the instructions, you'll be free to download the add-on and enjoy a long-term dose of Command & Conquer eroticism.


The main ingredient of the dish called The Uprising is a new single player campaign, consisting of a dozen scenarios. Most of the missions, as many as four, were received by the Soviets. The other factions (the Allies and Empire of the Rising Sun) had to settle for fewer challenges - three. All in all, it gives ten missions done in a similar manner to the Red Alert 3 style. True, the campaign features three additional scenarios in which Yuriko Omega is the main heroine, but they differ so much from the traditional fights that they should be treated more as curiosities. Let's add that a very interesting curiosity, but about it in a moment.

The campaign continues with the story that began with Red Alert 3. According to the scenario, the Allies won the next big win, and now they are occupying the Soviet Union and trying to maintain control over the tug of war that has been interrupted by the Empire of the Rising Sun. The addition of space is devoted to FutureTech, an Amsterdam-based company that delivers state-of-the-art technology to the Alliance, largely contributing to its victory. Most of the campaign missions will be associated with a mysterious corporation, but I will not betray what really matters here, so as not to spoil your fun.

It may seem that the ten scenarios are small (in the original version there were 27 of them), but after the campaign, there is no feeling of being overwhelmed. Undoubtedly, the effect on this state of affairs has several factors, the most important of which is the complexity of the mission. In Red Alert 3, individual scenarios did not end after the first task. The struggles often began with operations on a small piece of land, and in time, a great battle on a much larger territory. In the Uprising, this pattern has been successfully repaired, so you will need to work a lot before the victory plaque appears on the screen. Missions can take a lot of time - I think I'm not exaggerating to say that on average they are twice as long as those with Red Alert 3.

Another factor that determines this, and not others, is the increased difficulty of the game. The authors explicitly raised the bar in the Uprising, making scenarios far more demanding than those of the prototype. It is difficult to talk about the challenges of falling asleep, but I sincerely apologize that I have had several occasions to address some of the missions, mainly due to misjudgment of the enemy's capabilities and the mistakes made by the extension of the infrastructure. Scenarios in the Uprising also seem more intense. In base missions, the attacks take on strength every minute and you have to have eyes around your head to respond quickly to the next blows of hostile forces. On the other hand, when we have only a small squad, we have to pay a lot of attention to the protection of the army, because every attempt at the game "we mark all the units and the fight" is going to rattle after a few minutes of struggle.

Since it's about raising the bar, it's worth mentioning one more thing. Scenarios in the Uprising could have been a little easier if the authors would have allowed them to cooperate with them. In the stand, we always had an ally at hand, who helped in a variety of ways, from extracting ore to starting with systematic harassment of opponents. The extension completely ignored the possibility of working with the Allied, both the live and the computer-controlled. Players have to deal with the campaign themselves, which obviously increases the overall level of difficulty.

While the missions of the Soviets, the Allies and the Empire in the Uprising are roughly reminiscent of what we saw earlier in the prototype, the set of scenarios for Yuriko is absolute novum. Old fans of the Red Alert series certainly remember interesting tasks from the first cycle of the series, where the player was traversing a small unit of underground enemy complexes. Here the idea is very similar, but the authors of the game went on to implement it far more than Westwood studio thirteen years ago.

In all three missions of the last chapter of the campaign, we are in control of Yuriko Omega - a child of ethically reprehensible experiments carried out by the Empire of the Rising Sun. During combat, you can not command other units, as well as the ability to erect buildings. Even the Command & Conquer panel, which was previously on the right side of the screen, was dropped here. So what is the game? The answer is simple. The player takes care of only the little girl and traverses the individual maps from point A to point B, destroying all encountered enemies with supernatural abilities.

Yuriko has four powers. A girl can hit enemies with a wave of energy that turns people into bloody pulp; Take control of infantry and use stunned opponents to fight on your side; For a few seconds surround yourself with a protective barrier reflecting missiles, and also pick up items and some vehicles on the board and throw them in the direction you want. For all this, there is a basic attack by which Yuriko can destroy any, even the largest unit and buildings. This process lasts a few seconds, however, and the girl is prone to enemy attacks.

During the struggle, you can occasionally encounter special computers that allow you to develop the girl's destructive power, as well as increase your passive abilities, such as the strength of the basic attack. Finding all of them becomes necessary because enemies fight Yuriko more and more powerful units, such as the Emperor Kings or allied aircraft carriers. Without "picking up" our charge, facing such strong opponents will not be possible.

The Yuriko campaign changes into a simple hack and slash game, where the speed of extermination of incoming enemies is crucial to the success of the mission. The fun is very lively and incredibly spectacular. The girl scares a huge devastation, making monstrous devastation wherever it appears. Yuriko Omega is trying to get out of the POW camp. The Allied base can be turned into a complete ruin here, leaving no stone on the stone.

Yuriko's missions were very popular with me. Although the game itself seems to be monotonous in the long run, the mission is suddenly three, so we will not be bored in good time. Surely this is a nice change after traditional scenarios and it's really cool that the authors have come up with such an unusual idea. For me, it is a huge plus of the add.

In addition to the four mini-campaigns for a single player, the Uprising will also feature a special Challenge Mode, which offers fifty additional missions. The set is very interesting and it is at least three reasons. Firstly, scenarios need to be executed in a specific order, so that the whole does not seem to be a collection of random maps, but more akin to a traditional campaign. Secondly, during the struggle we can not immediately create all units - the latter must first be unlocked, taking on more challenges (as a result, the strongest armies will be available only in the final mission). Third and most important, any scenario can be played by any faction. This latter aspect is the greatest advantage of the new mode, as it gives the user a lot of freedom. Depending on the nature of the mission, the player may decide before the battle the units want to command. There is nothing to prevent the entire campaign from completing one conflict party, and then take the same scenarios, leading another faction this time. The additional advantage of Challenge mode is the ability to compete against time. Completing the struggle below the appointed date is difficult, and therefore gives great satisfaction.

In addition to the aforementioned advantages, the new gameplay mode also has its disadvantages, fortunately small. The main drawback is the construction of the mission on the mode of the skirmish so that they do not resemble extensive scenarios of traditional campaigns. There are no divergent tasks here - only the total dilapidation of the enemy's troops and the alignment of its bases with the earth, including even the smallest building, counts. Yes, sometimes there are some surprises, eg in the form of a large number of explosive barrels appearing in randomly selected locations, but this has nothing to do with the complexity of the mission at the campaign level. Too little negative should also be considered a lack of influence on the difficulty level of each scenario, that is, what traditional campaigns offer as standard. According to their name, these tasks are really challenging, so they can quickly discourage less experienced or impatient players from frequent defeats.

What else does the Uprising offer? First of all, a dozen inaccessible in the base of units, which introduce a lot of variation into the game, allowing you to experiment with new tactics for each faction. Enlargement also enriches the third Red Alert for premiere maps to the Skirmish mode, which is a multiplayer mode for the poor. Finally, the Uprising brings several attractions to the eye and ear. The campaign is accompanied by a lot of film cutscenes, prepared in a characteristic, loose, humorous moments characteristic of the series, and not only the original cast of actors, but also new acquisitions, including. Malcolm McDowell, Ric Flair, Jodi Lyn O'Keefe, Jamie Chung and Holly Valance. During the struggle we can listen to some new music, as good as those from the stand.

I never hinted that from the Command & Conquer series, I appreciated the Tiberium saga much better than the Soviet and Allied battles, so I did not feel the strong need to contact the new Red Alert shortly after its launch. It quickly turned out that I could not be guilty of prejudice, because the "three" immediately fell to my liking, and at times I liked even more than the War on Tiberium. After this verification of views, to contact the Uprising no one else had urged me not have to. I was worried that due to the unbelievable pace of production, the first add-on would turn out to be less than perfect, but again I was pleasantly surprised. Enlargement is really solid and in the game of solitaire, the player offers far more than Kane's anger. It is true that the multiplayer mode is completely ignored here, but I do not feel that this is why the Uprising is a bad addition. Campaigns, new Yuriko missions, Challenges, and a host of other novelties have compensated me for this loss and more.

Such products as the Rising are directed exclusively to the prototype fans, so random players to the last expansion of the Red Alert to convince I will not. If you do not like the classic RTS formula and irritate you with cutscenes, this add-on will not change your view of the Command & Conquer series. In addition, you can be discouraged by the high difficulty level of the additive - it is better to practice by playing on a stand. However, if you are a fan of this series, the third Red Alert you like very much and do not care about the multiplayer mode, buy this extension dark. You will certainly not fail.

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